Perhaps more than any other time in recent history, how we see places and one another will determine what happens next to our human family.

Panorama: the Journal of Intelligent Travel proudly offers up our latest collection, ‘Seen,’ in the spirit of sequi, to follow.  Alongside this fifth quarterly issue, our editorial vision has expanded on cue, following the lead of our readers, and this time we bring you more than forty travelogues on the edge, from around the world: lingering in memoir, in experimental, in lyricism, in poetry, in story, in image, all in celebration of how we see—and how we are seen. For example, our Photo Essay for this issue, a collection of film stills by Ugandan filmmaker Dilman Dila, objectifies you, the viewer, not the person in the photograph.

In Seen, we have several new additions, beginning with our new Editorial Commentary feature with an essay about travelogues and travel within the framework of Southeast Asian literature by Madhushree Ghosh. This issue also launches our new Outdoor Literature section full swing, with four nonfiction pieces about adventure travel through landscapes, all written by women of color, in keeping with our revolutionary vision of changing the game in areas we feel are lacking in mainstream travel writing. And finally, a section we have wanted to create since we all first came together, Footsteps, begins: a series about following the footsteps of another traveller.


We invite you to read this special issue, and suggest you begin with a few of our favorites: Robin Hemley’s hybrid work about travelling as a refugee, No One Will See Me Again Forever; Nahida Esmail’s climb of Kilimanjaro in a hijab, Everlasting; Jasmine Gui’s yearn and ebb poem, Three Cups of Tea; and Nicolas Sampson’s fictional exploration of love and self in Cyprus, Flames and Shadows.

Thank you for supporting our panoramic vision: one world, not one narrative.




EDITORIAL COMMENTARY







EDITOR’S CHOICE







PHOTO ESSAY







OUTDOOR LITERATURE










FOOTSTEPS

INFLUENCER







TRIPTYCH




One place, three ways: London





POETRY










FICTION













STREETVIEW







NONFICTION













CARTOGRAPHY







POETRY










NONFICTION
















EATEN